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solo300x225As divers, we’re taught from day one that scuba is a team sport — well, a team of two, anyway. The buddy ­system is a proven safety net, offering the increased benefit of redundant-air supplies, electronics — and brains. For decades we’ve found tactical support and emotional comfort in ­knowing that help is just a hand signal away. But sometimes we just want to get away by ourselves.

Solo diving once only existed in the realm of technical diving, along with public-safety divers, scientists, underwater photographers, hunters and other highly specialized breeds.

In recent years, however, ­training agencies have caught up to an increasing demand for ­recreational ­instruction and safety protocols ­covering solo diving.

“There are lots of different reasons a person might not want to dive with a buddy. Logistically speaking, they simply might not have a buddy available. As an instructor, I hear the excuses ‘I can’t go diving since I have no one to dive with,’ and ‘I would love to learn scuba, but I don’t have anyone to take the course with.’ You could wait your whole life for someone else to do what you want to do.”

“True solo diving is even more ­relaxing than diving with a buddy. You have no obligation to check on someone else and ­wonder if they have or will have any issues. And you can also make up stories and no one will contradict you. Maybe it was a whale shark, maybe it was a shadow — only you really know.”

Because solo divers choose to take an important, foundational safety ­measure out of their dive plan — their buddy — they must take on added ­responsibility and be extra prepared for emergencies, both physically and mentally.

“Solo diving is about being self-­sufficient, the course involves training the diver to carry their buddy: an extra air source. ‘As long as you are breathing, all problems can be solved underwater.’ Carrying a redundant-air supply helps solve that issue, and when I say extra, I mean that it is not part of the plan and is only to be touched in event of an emergency.”

You need three foundational elements to be a safe solo diver: “The right attitude or mindset, the right equipment and the right plan.

“Some of the more-obvious risks when diving solo are dealing with any and all emergencies that need to be handled quickly and by the diver, since no one else is around to lend a hand, or a regulator,” he explains. “No one will be there to help get you unstuck from a restriction or to show you the way back to the boat in case you get lost. The solo diver must be prepared to handle everything by himself. It’s 100 percent on you.”

If you are interested in Solo dving then contact us at our Big Blue Tech department www.bigbluetech.net

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Read 208 times Last modified on Tuesday, 24 October 2017 08:24