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Big Blue Diving - Koh Tao - Thailand - 5 Reasons to do the Advanced Course

5 Reasons to do the Advanced Course

 

 

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  1. Because deeper is always better

 

We dive for one main reason – to see cool stuff underwater. Years of experience have told me that most of you want to see the biggest creatures that patrol the divesites – hunting barracuda, flapping mantas, big fat grouper, nasty-looking sharks and the fattest fish of all, the mighty whaleshark. So where’s the best place to find the big stuff so many of you desire?

Deep is where all the biggest stuff likes to roam. Our huge schools of pickhandle and chevron barracuda are always hanging out at around 25 metres on our best sites of Chumphon Pinnacle and South-West Pinnacle, and witnessing these in action is something that all visitors to Koh Tao should experience at least once; there’s nothing quite like being circled by a mighty group of tightly-packed fish, often blocking out the sun with their density!

The massive (delicious-looking) grouper we’re also lucky enough to have underwater here tend to chase and flirt with each other on the bottom of the deeper sites, and the majority are usually found at a depth of 25-30 metres. It’s at these depths where we can also see large schooling fusiliers fighting for their lives against the tennis-racket sized queenfish and trevally, which like nothing better than a feast of fusilier for breakfast. Watching these larger predators working together to separate a victim from their group is a joy to behold, with the balling and rolling smaller fish giving a visual treat to the lucky deep diver!

 

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  1. If you’re not a night diver, then you’re not really a diver

Ask anyone about to do their first ever night dive how they feel, and they’ll usually admit to feeling a mix of excitement and a little bit of pooping themselves too. To be diving in the pitch black water is an intimidating thought at first, but ask the same divers on their return and more often than not they’ll describe the dive as very relaxed, peaceful and whole lot of fun!

To put it quite simply, there’s something very special about diving at night. One of the most stunning sights you can see underwater is to witness the hundreds of tiny star-like bioluminescent phytoplankton streaking from the fins of your diving buddy, and as you only have this small circle of light from your torch to concentrate on it’s not long before you’re taken away into a beautifully tranquil world, where hidden wonders now pass by freely, using the cover of night to hunt.

Miss it at your peril!

 

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  1. No more unwatchable shaky videos, or out of focus photos

One of the recommendations from all of us here at Big Blue is to do the PADI/SSI Perfect Buoyancy dive of the advanced course. Not only does it help you perfect your technique underwater and have you gliding around the reef like a dolphin, but it also emphasizes the importance of good buoyancy control, using just the lungs to move you through the water and no longer having to kick up and down, like a peasant.

With this perfect buoyancy you have now obtained, the quality of your images and recordings dramatically improves. Most of our divers now carry some sort of camera, and it’s nice to be able to show off your dives with pictures that are in focus and clear, and video that doesn’t look like it was shot by Michael J. Fox. These days where everything needs to be instantly put on Instagram and shared on Facebook, why not show off with the types of recordings that wouldn’t look out of place in National Geographic!

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  1. Abandon your dive instructor!

One of the tasks that must be completed in the Advanced course is the Navigation dive, where we will teach you how to use a compass to find your way around a dive site like a pro, and also how to use the natural features of the dive site to work out where all the most interesting things will be without getting totally lost and making a fool out of yourself. Once you’ve successfully mastered the (surprisingly easy) navigation techniques, it’s possible to safely and competently dive with just a buddy - no more following your instructor like a sucker!

This independence underwater is something that you’ll strive for every time you dive after you try it for the first time, as when you’re at the front of the group you’ll realise that you see a hell of a lot more marine life that you do merely following. It also gives you a lot more confidence underwater too, and with this increase in ability comes, as ever, extended dive times – more confidence always leads to more relaxed breathing, which in turn gives us maximum time underwater!

 

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  1. Filter out the bad divers

Something that most fundivers have experienced at least once (and the scourge of many of my own Thailand diving trips) is the bad diver in the group. Kicking up sand, banging into you from all angles and usually breathing at an incredible rate, sharing your dive with someone of limited ability can really ruin your diving experience, and a fast breather in the group can easily make your whole dive party ascend well before you were planning to.

More often than not if there’s someone breathing too fast or banging into the back of you, it’s an Open Water diver. By completing the Advanced certification you’ll be separated from these (often) fresh new divers, and put with others with similar abilities and control of buoyancy – hello one hour dives, and goodbye surfacing with half your tank left over!

 

 

You can book your SSI or PADI Advanced courses with us every day, face to face or on the internet machine.

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